What Causes Plaque and Why Is It Harmful?

Every dental problem deserves a corresponding groan of complaints and a whimper of disappointment. Aside from causing us pain, these dental booboos cause us more trouble than we can think of. It’s a good thing that we can easily set an appointment with our oral doctors to aid us with our dental concerns like how to fix teeth gap, how to prevent bleeding gums, how to treat halitosis, and most important of all, how to avoid plaque build-up.

The Catalyst

Plaque build-up is one of the most common dental problems. Everyone is susceptible to having one, but how are these plaques formed?

 

  •    Diet

It takes several elements found inside your mouth for plaque formation to happen. Saliva, food bits, carbohydrates, and your mouth’s natural bacteria– combine them all, and you’ll have this sticky acid in your mouth slowly fixating on your pearly whites.

You better start searching for answers on how to close gaps in teeth the moment it hardens. Once it does, decay and tooth loss shall soon follow unless something’s done before it’s too late.

 

  •    Habit

Habit plays a big role in the formation and the prevention of plaque.

If you have been faithfully brushing and flossing your teeth at least twice a day, keep up the good work. However, if you have been skipping a lot, consider yourself warned. It only takes a few hours for plaque to harden on your teeth following its formation.

 

  •    Condition

Thinking how to fix teeth gap and how to perform dental extractions for pregnant women may be a dangerous scenario. You don’t want anything to harm the baby, do you? For all you know, pregnant women are more prone to plaque formation. Research says that hormonal change during pregnancy affects the body’s fighting response to the plaque.

 

The Consequence

The trouble about plaque build-up is that you will not only be thinking of ways on how to close gaps in teeth should you have an unforeseen tooth loss as a result of the formation. There’s more agony you have to deal with than just that.

 

  •    Bad Breath

Bad breath, also known as halitosis, is one of the most embarrassing things to manage as a result of plaque. There may be a lot of ways to conquer the humiliation, but the journey towards it is emotionally distressful.

 

  •    Shyness

Plaque formation usually develops on hidden parts of your mouth. However, there are instances that the plaque forms on the front teeth, which makes the ugly mark of the build-up visible.

This could most likely affect one’s self-esteem. Having to face this emotionally and mentally draining stage could backfire on one’s personal life, particularly the– social life.

 

  •    Periodontal Disease

How does plaque build-up affect the gums? How do the gums affect the heart?

Hardened plaque brings about tooth decay, bad breath, and inflammation of gums. Moreover, the added harm begins when bleeding initiates. This opens the bloodstream for oral bacteria to injure certain organs in the body, most especially our body’s blood-pumping vessel. The association between cardiovascular illnesses and dental hygiene explains in a 2009 research conducted by the American Academy of Periodontology together with the American Journal of Cardiology.

 

The Change

We’ve heard all the bad things about plaque build-up. However, its downside is not the end of it. Something can still be done if not to treat it, at least to prevent it.

 

  •    Dental Visits

How often do you see your dentist? Do you go twice a year, once every 12 months, or never?

Paying your dentist a visit only when you can no longer stand the pain of your toothache is not the way to do it. Ideally, everyone is advised to have their teeth checked once every six months.

Aside from preventing the plaque formation, which is a cardiovascular threat, dental appointments are also essential in providing counter action for emerging dental problems. You’ll know what treatment is best for particular malocclusions (or teeth crowding), how to close gaps in teeth, etc.

Also, it’s a way of receiving professional advice regularly to maintain good dental health. So, get yourself together, conquer your dental phobia, and bring yourself to the dentist.

 

  •    Personal Hygiene

Going home after a dental clinic visit requires a strong will and consistency to perform your dentist’s advice. At the end of the day, it’s all up to you on what you make of the information shared by your dentist. Always brush and floss.

   

  •    Awareness

It’s not enough hearing and applying what your dentist has to tell you. Your dental appointments are only for a short limited time. You may want the dental chit-chat to go on, but given the long line of patients after you, that would be impossible.

The time you spend on the internet, however, is something you can control. You might want to take advantage of it by gaining as much information about taking better care of your dental health, preventing plaque build-up, and getting rid of the more serious problems it brings. Read more, know more.

Plaque formation is just the beginning of a long list of dental complications when left untreated. The damage control act now lies in your hands.

 

Every dental problem deserves a corresponding groan of complaints and a whimper of disappointment. Aside from causing us pain, these dental booboos cause us more trouble than we can think of. It’s a good thing that we can easily set an appointment with our oral doctors to aid us with our dental concerns like how to fix teeth gap, how to prevent bleeding gums, how to treat halitosis, and most important of all, how to avoid plaque build-up.

 

About the Author: Coleen Winton is capably competitive in industry content writing that suits the needs of every business. She can spice up your marketing campaign with the necessary content and then incorporate it into Orthofill services.

 

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